Artistically Social

Arts in Miami Through the Eyes of Amy Rosenberg


Amy Rosenberg
Amy Rosenberg is an attorney and arts advocate who founded the Overtown Music Project and the Arsht Center's young patrons group. She is the co-founder of the environmental non-profit Dream in Green. Amy is a member of Art Basel's Junior Host Committee and sits on the Board of the Funding Arts Network. She also serves on the New World Symphony's Friends Committee as well as The Wolfsonian-FIU's Visionaries Committee.




June can be a lonely affair in Miami. Thousands of our finest leave this blisteringly hot peninsula for the Hamptons, Aspen, North Carolina and New Mexico. Artist Juan Griego's Hug Machine can come in pretty handy during this period of abandonment.

The life-size work has a heartbeat (a metronome), a face (Juan's own face plays on an integrated television that was found in the garbage) and can literally hug the viewer if its pedals are pumped. The Machine is made of wooden scraps Griego found at the Wolfsonian and is blinged out in gold luster. Griego's work is poignant, intelligent and defined by his belief that the mechanics of art and formalized institutions like galleries and museums must be deconstructed and redefined.

Green Room Society, the Adrienne Arsht Center's young patrons group, celebrated chairman Max Pierre's birthday and hosted Talib Kweli of Black Star fame at The Florida Room. DJ Maseo of De La Soul and Agape, featuring Nadia Harris, were also presented. The Florida Room was mobbed with hipsters taking photos of former Black Star member Kweli with their Smart Phones. In attendance: Mayur Patel, Rodrigo Gonzalez, Austin Cohen, Armen Shaomian and Ernesto Arguello.


Max Pierre, Talib Kweli and Ricky Arriola
at Green Room Society party


Green Room Society Party at Florida Room

The Bass Museum of Art presented Human Rites, an exhibition that paired the Museum's ancient works with contemporary pieces. Fifteenth century devotional statues of Mary were placed near works by contemporary artists like Marina Abramovic and Janine Antoni. Viewers were dazzled by Chinese artist Ai Weiwei's Forever Bicycles, a quasi-architectural sculpture made of dozens of conjoined bikes. The bikes are Forever Bicycles, particularly noteworthy because the company is state-run and makes up a significant portion of the more than 10,000,000 bikes in Shanghai. The sculpture is also a nod to Duchamp's Bicycle Wheel.

Under the Sun, WLRN's local radio show, had a live special event about the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti. The event took place at Archbishop Curley Notre Dame Prep School in Little Haiti and featured live hip hop and choir performances, interactive graphic art, live interviews and audio excerpts from Under the Sun's upcoming radio special. Hosts Dan Grech and Alicia Zuckerman hosted the event, which also functioned as a fundraiser for Haitian relief efforts.

Diaspora Vibe Gallery presented Exodus, a time-based portal for artists to express their observations through video. According to the internationally featured artists, video can act as a canvas for dialogue. Each video is exposed continuously and concurrently on separate monitors and engages the viewer in a kind of conversation. Artist Monique Diaz's provocatively titled, Animation - A Tale of Self- Mutilation and Self-Insemination, showcases an aspiring rap video girl and Cinderella's step-sisters.

Until next time...

Amy Rosenberg is an attorney and arts advocate who founded the Overtown Music Project and the Arsht Centerís young patrons group. She is the co-founder of the environmental non-profit Dream in Green. Amy is a member of Art Baselís Junior Host Committee and sits on the Board of the Funding Arts Network. She also serves on the New World Symphonyís Friends Committee as well as The Wolfsonian-FIUís Visionaries Committee.